This is it! This is the week for art lovers and art collectors in Sedona. The First Annual Sedona Fine Art Auction will be featuring significant works of art by Jean Carbonetti, Maynard Dixon, Alan Wolton, Ken Rowe, Ken Payne, Jennifer McChristian, Tom Lynch, Arturo Chavez, Joella Jean Mahoney, Robert Burridge, and many other nationally known artists on May 21st. There’s something for everyone at this outstanding event and best of all… there’s FREE ADMISSION!

 

The event is hosted by Sedona Arts Center and is a benefit  fundraising event supporting the educational mission and ongoing programming of the Sedona Arts Center. Can't make it Saturday? Place your bid at the public preview and silent auction on Thursday, May 19th or Friday, May 20th from 4 - 7pm at the old Public Library Building at 395 Jordan Rd. in uptown Sedona.

 

On Saturday, May 21st, events will begin at Noon with artist demonstrations featuring well-known Sedona artists working on sculpture and paintings to be completed by 3pm for the live auction. Visitors will be able to stroll the grounds, view artists working, bid on silent auction items and preview the live auction items that will be on display throughout the facility. There will be refreshments available and a special raffle of Sedona's Bounty - by Master Sculptor, Susan Kliewer.

 

Buy them now! Raffle tickets are available for purchase now at Sedona Art Center’s Fine Art Gallery in Uptown Sedona or online at SedonaArtAuction.com.

 

The silent auction and preview will end at 3pm, at which time the drawing for the raffle will be made. At 4:00 pm there will be a gala featuring catered cuisine, Sedona Arts Center’s private label wine by Echo Canyon Vineyards and the final viewing of the artwork before the live auction begins. The live auction itself will begin at 5:00 pm. You can sign up to get your bidder number online at SedonaArtAuction.com or by calling the Sedona Arts Center at 928.282.3809. ADMISSION IS FREE!

 

  • Auction preview and bidding on over 25 silent auction items May 19 & 20th from 4-7

  • Final Silent Auction bidding and Artist Demonstration event May 21 noon to 3pm

  • Live Auction, wine and refreshments 4-7

 

The live auction and preview will take place at the former Public Library Building at 395 Jordan Rd. in uptown Sedona. Remember - Free admission to the public!

 

Remember: grow; learn; conserve; preserve; create; question; educate; change; and free your mind.


About: Kelli Klymenko is an artist, a faculty member and the Marketing & Events Coordinator at Sedona Arts Center: a gathering place where artists can learn, teach, and exhibit their works at the center’s School of the Arts and Fine Art Gallery in uptown Sedona.



Let our voices rise up and travel on the winds to all the people of the world; let us be heard.

 

On Friday, President Obama released a report ("Re-Investing in Arts Education: Winning America’s Future Through Creative Schools") encouraging the arts in education. Anyone who’s met me knows that I’ve been saying this alongside artists and teachers for quite some time now. In fact, my very first blog here cited the importance of community, culture and arts in education. It seems our collective voice is finally being heard, perhaps in part by celebrity endorsements and reactions to proposed budget cuts which would cripple the art community. But even though the battle isn’t over - there is hope.

 

The report reads: “Arts integration models, the practice of teaching across classroom subjects in tandem with the arts, have been yielding some particularly promising results in school reform and closing the achievement gap. Most recently, cutting-edge studies in neuroscience have been further developing our understanding of how arts strategies support crucial brain development in learning.” But for whatever reason you can imagine, budget cuts are still being made to arts programs in schools everywhere, and arts instruction is on a “downward trend”.

 

However, this doesn’t stop you from making the changes and sharing the wealth of creativity you have at your fingertips to children of all ages. Take for example the Arts Immersion I wrote about last week. The benefit from these culturally saturated programs is unmatched and essential to growing minds. Thanks to everyone who takes part in sharing the arts, our children have a chance to be more creative and bring new innovations and ideas to our world.

 

The arts will always need your voice to help protect and preserve the continuity of our artistic community, and there’s no greater voice in Sedona than the Sedona Arts Center (SAC). Not only does the arts center have a wonderful educational curriculum on campus, SAC supports local artists and programs in schools, creates outreach programs and opens its doors to artists of all ages. Last week SAC gave a tour to the Tuba City Boarding School Gifted and Talented Program’s 3rd and 4th graders. And, if young aspiring artists can’t come to Sedona, we often go to them and share the joy of creativity.

 

Outreach programs, Art Immersions and benefits are needed to continue the growth of our renowned cultural hub here in Sedona. This month on May 21st, Sedona Arts Center is presenting the first annual “Sedona Fine Art Auction” at the old Sedona Public Library on 395 Jordan Road in Uptown Sedona. The SFAA is a benefit fundraising event supporting the educational mission and ongoing programming of the Sedona Arts Center. With free admission, artist demonstrations all afternoon and wine and hors d’oeuvres, this is sure to be a spectacular event for art lovers and collectors and you! This is just one of many programs designed to bring art and culture to our community.

 

So let’s all cheer the fact that the importance of arts education is being recognized - but let us also continue to do our part in donating, volunteering and supporting neighborhood programs and benefits that contribute to the arts in our community. Get smart - support the arts.

 

Remember: grow; learn; conserve; preserve; create; question; educate; change; and free your mind.


About: Kelli Klymenko is an artist, a faculty member and the Marketing & Events Coordinator at Sedona Arts Center: a gathering place where artists can learn, teach, and exhibit their works at the center’s School of the Arts and Fine Art Gallery in uptown Sedona.

I’ve often written about the importance of art in the community and in schools. This past week something wonderful happened. An Aztec Culture-themed Middle School Arts Immersion took place April 26th through 29th. Students learned to play drums in a traditional Aztec style; they learned Aztec dances to Airdancematch those rhythms; they created Aztec murals and made sculptures which reflected the organic nature of a network of relationships (such as those within a cell and those within a tribe); they wrote poetry. The rhythm of four different Aztec beats for the dances permeated each of the classrooms. The symbolism and style of the Aztec stories was carried through the murals, dance, poetry, and the drums. All of this was interwoven into a final performance – but more important was the three day arts immersion itself and the transformation within the students and change made at the school.

 

The program was designed working closely with the West Sedona Middle School faculty and Principal of West Sedona School, Dr. Lisa Hirsch. For this immersion the Sedona Arts Center brought artists in from as far as Chicago and Wisconsin to teach in their area of expertise  - Roberto Ferraya was the expert in Aztec dance. and Sandra Zahn taught drumming and emotional intelligence (in this case recognizing our network of support). Kate Pearlman was the poetry guide for the students.  Jessica Nelson taught an art project on the Mayan Alphabet and the Codex Borbonicus. Libby Caldwell taught the mural component as was the conceptual organizer of the overall project.

 Airpaint

What is an Arts Immersion?

 

“Art Immersions are designed to engage all the senses and create in the students a sense of experiencing another time, place or culture,” says Vince Fazio, Director of the School of the Arts at Sedona Arts Center.

 

Art Immersions were developed by the Sedona Arts Center with former City Arts Education Commissioner, Libby Caldwell and the school district. During the Arts Immersion, rather than attending their regular classes, the students participate only in art classes for three to four days. The art classes are designed to stimulate all the senses, creating a memorable and meaningful experience for the students, while simultaneously delivering a meaningful curriculum.

 

Programs like these not only benefit arts and culture in general, they offer students unique experiences traditionally not offered in schools. The Sedona Arts Center continually creates exceptional opportunities for Airdrumchildren and adults to immerse themselves in all forms of art. For example, an event such as the Sedona Fine Art Auction, (a benefit fundraising event on May 21 this year) supports the educational mission and ongoing programming of the Sedona Arts Center. Supporters and donors understand the importance of these continued programs and their value to the community. For tickets to the Sedona Fine Art Auction and to preview live auction items, visit www.SedonaArtAuction.com.


 

Remember: grow; learn; conserve; preserve; create; question; educate; change; and free your mind.


About: Kelli Klymenko is an artist, a faculty member and the Marketing & Events Coordinator at Sedona Arts Center: a gathering place where artists can learn, teach, and exhibit their works at the center’s School of the Arts and Fine Art Gallery in uptown Sedona.

Close your eyes and imagine this... No wait! Open your eyes and read this. You're an artist. You have unbelievable talent. You're portfolio is unprecedented and your use of colors is unmatched. The words that flow from your pen illuminate unimaginable worlds that future leaders will attempt to construct. Your music inspires woodland creatures to join in chorus. Your art makes hearts stop, children laugh, and elders cry tears of joy.

This is the age of absolute opportunity for artists and creative thinkers to share their work with the world. There has never been a greater time to reach so many people. The doors are wide open and all you have to do is step through them. Creative people have an unfair advantage over everyone else. We have the ability to find unique ways to bring life to our art. All we have to do is dream, create, and share. And here are the top ten reasons why you should be doing exactly that.

1. Dreaming. Everyone loves to dream. I dream all the time. Day and night. Dreaming helps us escape from daily monotony and dreary politics. Dreaming stimulates our creative minds and opens up new possibilities and new thought processes that can change the world. Dreaming is creating.

2. Creating. Since dreaming is creating, I suppose creating is dreaming, right? Possibly. Creating is the ultimate human experience. We create masterpieces, symphonies, societies, cultures, and life. We create some form of art every day of our lives. We just have to open our eyes to recognize it.

3. Sharing. ...is caring, right? Even if we dream for selfish reasons that lead to creating something for ourselves - there is no greater joy than sharing it with someone else. We innately seek out approval, acceptance and compliments. We can't get this if we don't share a little bit of ourselves or our art.

4. Doing. You can't dream, create and share if you don't do anything. You could be the most incredible artist of all times, but if you don't actually "do" then nothing will be "done" and no one will know you existed. So "do" often and with exuberant frequency so that we can all know you are one of action. (and have a pulse)

5. Didn't I just stress the importance of dreaming? Dreams drive us and move us. They flow through us like a river of life-giving inspiration. Our lives are built upon our dreams. Your future relies wholeheartedly upon them. Dream of doing and then make it so.

6. Your art is your life and the manifestation of thoughts and visions and dreams. Flowing from you is an incredible gift not only to you, but to the world around you. Without your art, you would not be you. Without you - there would be no art. How will we know you if you don't share your art?

7. The world's a stage and we are all performers; some good; some bad: but all a part of the same theater company called life. It's our duty as creative individuals to make our work available to the world. We have an opportunity to break through global barriers in this golden age of social networking. Our art can reach people all over the world, so long as we "do" and "share".

8. It's not just a pretty picture or an interesting song. We want to know more about you, more about your process. We want to see inside your brain. The days of the enigmatic, impersonal, eccentric artist are passing. The world wants to know you are just like everyone else, but with a kick. Share your thoughts and dreams with your neighbors.

9. Don't just sell your art. Remember what it's truly about. Give away your art. (But not for free) Don't be afraid to post, tweet and update your world, your work - to everyone. If you hide from everyone, fearing they will steal your work or ideas - they probably will. But if you stand atop a mountain and declare, "This is my art!" - Well, then we will all admire you and say, "Look at their art!"

10. Without your dreaming, creating and sharing - the world would be a truly barren desert. No matter what your level of skill, position or part you take in the world, artist or not; your dreams are important to our life together on this planet. The creations you share (whether thought out or spontaneous) will build our future. Without these three simple things, your voice is simply a whisper.

 

Remember: grow; learn; conserve; preserve; create; question; educate; change; and free your mind.


About: Kelli Klymenko is an artist, a faculty member and the Marketing & Events Coordinator at Sedona Arts Center: a gathering place where artists can learn, teach, and exhibit their works at the center’s School of the Arts and Fine Art Gallery in uptown Sedona.

I have entirely too much to do this week. Please don't get me wrong, I'm not complaining at all. I really don't mind so much. The only challenge for me at times is - deadlines. We all have them, call them what you will – goals / objectives / workloads / deadlines - they must be kept! And if you're anything like me, you've just waited until the eleventh hour and this blog is now due.

Sometimes we all hit a brick wall. We can sit before our blank canvases, white screens or hopelessly empty notebooks waiting desperately for creativity to manifest itself. I’ve spent hours upon hours coming back to the same blank sheet of paper, always expecting something to be there each time I return. Is this blog written yet? Poof! Unfortunately we can't wave a magic wand, wiggle our nose or blink and nod with folded arms to make our art complete. Art in all its forms takes patience, motivation, inspiration and dedication. And sometimes we just can’t break down those walls.

Fear not! Better days will come!

Don’t let a shortness of enthusiasm or impetus rule your art! These uncreative moments often yield greater insight because they are born from frustration. "Angst makes for great art" (or so I've been told) I know plenty of artists who swim in anguish to create truly intense compositions. It’s most certainly true that some art can spawn from sorrow and unrest; however I personally prefer peaceful creativity over anxious inspiration. But we all know how hard that can sometimes be to come by.

Our busy lives are filled with deadlines, appointments and rushing about. An overabundance of activities and thoughts can often crowd our creativity. Occasionally just by "doing" our inspiration comes. Any art form requires at least starting somewhere until creativity takes hold. (By the way, not everything will be a masterpiece and some things may in fact be quite... well there sometimes aren't any words to describe it!) But that's okay, because we can learn from mistakes. Instead of staring at that empty screen, I'll type words in random order. I find that if I write thoughts, ideas and pointless phrases down, they evolve into prose, instruction or personal masterpieces. I only get there by actually "doing" - once I've procrastinated to the eleventh hour plus fifty-nine minutes, of course.

And so by simply taking action, I am able to paint symphonies with words that were tossed together from a once hopeless void. I can then imagine the coarse wind on my face as bitter tasting silence falls from me. I can remember words I've written before to reuse, revive, renew and reinvent my inspiration. And that's when I become my own muse. That’s when my inspiration flows through my own blood and my art emerges.

So if you've hit the proverbial brick wall, go ahead and pull a David Copperfield and walk on straight through. The other side is not far off, even though it may be difficult to see.

 

Remember: grow; learn; conserve; preserve; create; question; educate; change; and free your mind.


About: Kelli Klymenko is an artist, a faculty member and the Marketing & Events Coordinator at Sedona Arts Center: a gathering place where artists can learn, teach, and exhibit their works at the center’s School of the Arts and Fine Art Gallery in uptown Sedona.

Bravo! Last week, Academy Award-winning actor Kevin Spacey spoke on behalf of the Arts. And he wasn’t the only one! Alec Baldwin and Hill Harper spoke on Capitol Hill urging lawmakers to not cut funding to the arts. I’ve written countless times on how cutting funding for public programs such as the National Endowment of the Arts and PBS is preposterous. Well, I have to say it’s nice to see others step up and raise their voices in protest.

 

Some argue that such programs should be self sustaining like commercial television, but in a culture where young pop art flourishes, by the time we get to appreciate the finer expressions (and not all do) of the arts, the programs, the artists who have dedicated their lives to perfect these may long be gone and forgotten. PBS offers programs on subjects in history and the arts that help us to understand where we came from and where we are going. Programs like these provide hope and guidance for future generations.

 

The National Endowment for the Arts is a life support for programs of every ilk. From Sesame Street to PBS biographies, forgotten history to exotic places of the world… like Sedona! And this latest battle against the arts funding by some of our political leaders is far from over. With a little research, you’ll soon find that some presidential and political hopefuls still describe the arts as ‘frivolous’ spending.

 

"We are not a poor country. We are a wealthy country, but our real power comes from the power of our ideas," Kevin Spacey said "This is not about saving money. This is ideological."

 

This is not the time to cut the arts and squash creativity. During this slow rise of the economy as we get back on track we need more art, more creative minds to find better, sustainable ways for us to live and move forward. The backwards thinking of cutting creative programs needs to end now, so we can grow to be a more culturally mindful peaceful nation.

 

Go to nea.org to support the National Endowment of the Arts and write to your local representatives and let them know you want to preserve the arts above all else. And don’t forget to thank Kevin Spacey and all the others who rise up to share in their support of the arts!

 

We are not poor, but rich in art.

 

Remember: grow; learn; conserve; preserve; create; question; educate; change; and free your mind.


About: Kelli Klymenko is an artist, a faculty member and the Marketing & Events Coordinator at Sedona Arts Center: a gathering place where artists can learn, teach, and exhibit their works at the center’s School of the Arts and Fine Art Gallery in uptown Sedona.