Human Interest
Typography
He doesn’t paint, sculpt or create tangible art, but Christopher Lane received the 2009 Sedona Mayor’s Arts Award.

The second annual awards ceremony presented by the city of Sedona Arts and Culture Commission on Thursday,

Nov. 12, presented awards in four categories: Individual, Organization or Business, Education and Lifetime Achievement.

mayors-art-awards-11-18“The awards are from all citizens with the mayor representing us. We received nominations for some extraordinary candidates,” Commission Chairwoman Linda Pallas said. “The awards are for enhancing, promoting and advocating for the arts over time.”

While admitting he himself possesses little artistic talent, Mayor Rob Adams said Sedona is a city animated by its artists and thanked those in attendance for all they bring to the city.

“We all have an artist in us,” Adams said, while announcing a poet would be honored with the Sedona Mayor’s Arts Award for an individual.

Lane is the poet Adams referred to. He not only writes and reads poetry, he brings it to several diverse audiences through his many programs and projects throughout Sedona and the Verde Valley.

“Christopher Lane has put Sedona on the map of poetry. He has lifted the spoken word to a new level,” Commissioner Mei Wei Wong said before she helped Steve Douglas present Lane with the award which included a piece of artwork made specifically for the occasion by Joanne Hiscox called “Each New Day.”

Among Lane’s program creations is Young Voices Be Heard and Poetry Out Loud at Sedona Red Rock High School. He also reads familiar poetry to Alzheimer’s patients.

“It helps spark memories for them,” Lane said. He talks with his hands and face as well as his voice. He also works all over the state in memory care for retirement complexes.

Lane teaches youth through poetry to show them “how they can use their voice,” he said. “You can create art in words with poetry.”

He followed his acceptance speech with a humorous poem he wrote about Sedona which brought the audience to laughter many times.

The Organization or Business Award went to the Goldenstein Gallery owned by Linda Goldenstein, who grew up in Camp Verde. She started in the arts when she operated a high-end furniture company in Santa Fe, N.M., then opened her own business there. One day she helped a friend with her gallery and saw how much the people loved the art for just what it was.

After the 9/11 attacks, Goldenstein returned to the Verde Valley and soon opened her gallery in Uptown.

“Sedona inspires me,” Goldenstein said.

Mary Pope, vice chairwoman for the commission, said Goldenstein Gallery has supported and contributed to art in many forms through numerous performances and events.

“The gallery draws collectors, celebrities and art aficionados from around the world,” Pope said. “It has set an example for the entire Sedona art family.”

Goldenstein said the gallery is a vision inspired and made possible through many people especially the staff and the many artists who show their work.

“Teamwork makes the dream work. I love the arts. You never know what’s going to happen or who is going to walk in the door,” she said.

The Sedona Arts Festival has been a significant part of arts happenings in Sedona for many years. It has evolved into becoming one of the finest arts events in the world, according to Commissioners Pat Reed and Rod Abbott who presented the Education Award to the festival.

Its mission is to increase awareness and exposure to the arts while enhancing a sense of community. The festival contributes to art programs and scholarships in Greater Sedona. It draws more than 150 artists and craftspersons from around the world. The next annual festival is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9 and 10.

“The fall festival brings in hundreds of artists and thousands of visitors from around the world. It provides educational experiences for young people like the KidZone. It allows kids to explore arts in a safe, fun environment,” Reed said.

The festival has contributed approximately $245,000 for arts programs and scholarships since its inception in 1989, Abbott said.

“They are committed to artists of all ages,” he said.

No nominations were received for the Lifetime Achievement award.

The commission also presented the document “The Culture of Sedona” which was more than five years in the making, gathering information from a wide range of sources to define the culture of Sedona. The document was approved and adopted by the commission, Dec. 4, 2008, and by the Sedona City Council, Oct. 27.

 

Lu Stitt can be reached at 282-7795, ext. 122, or e-mail lu@larsonnewspapers.com

 

He doesn’t paint, sculpt or create tangible art, but Christopher Lane received the 2009 Sedona Mayor’s Arts Award.

The second annual awards ceremony presented by the city of Sedona Arts and Culture Commission on Thursday,

Nov. 12, presented awards in four categories: Individual, Organization or Business, Education and Lifetime Achievement.

mayors-art-awards-11-18“The awards are from all citizens with the mayor representing us. We received nominations for some extraordinary candidates,” Commission Chairwoman Linda Pallas said. “The awards are for enhancing, promoting and advocating for the arts over time.”

While admitting he himself possesses little artistic talent, Mayor Rob Adams said Sedona is a city animated by its artists and thanked those in attendance for all they bring to the city.

“We all have an artist in us,” Adams said, while announcing a poet would be honored with the Sedona Mayor’s Arts Award for an individual.

Lane is the poet Adams referred to. He not only writes and reads poetry, he brings it to several diverse audiences through his many programs and projects throughout Sedona and the Verde Valley.

“Christopher Lane has put Sedona on the map of poetry. He has lifted the spoken word to a new level,” Commissioner Mei Wei Wong said before she helped Steve Douglas present Lane with the award which included a piece of artwork made specifically for the occasion by Joanne Hiscox called “Each New Day.”

Among Lane’s program creations is Young Voices Be Heard and Poetry Out Loud at Sedona Red Rock High School. He also reads familiar poetry to Alzheimer’s patients.

“It helps spark memories for them,” Lane said. He talks with his hands and face as well as his voice. He also works all over the state in memory care for retirement complexes.

Lane teaches youth through poetry to show them “how they can use their voice,” he said. “You can create art in words with poetry.”

He followed his acceptance speech with a humorous poem he wrote about Sedona which brought the audience to laughter many times.

The Organization or Business Award went to the Goldenstein Gallery owned by Linda Goldenstein, who grew up in Camp Verde. She started in the arts when she operated a high-end furniture company in Santa Fe, N.M., then opened her own business there. One day she helped a friend with her gallery and saw how much the people loved the art for just what it was.

After the 9/11 attacks, Goldenstein returned to the Verde Valley and soon opened her gallery in Uptown.

“Sedona inspires me,” Goldenstein said.

Mary Pope, vice chairwoman for the commission, said Goldenstein Gallery has supported and contributed to art in many forms through numerous performances and events.

“The gallery draws collectors, celebrities and art aficionados from around the world,” Pope said. “It has set an example for the entire Sedona art family.”

Goldenstein said the gallery is a vision inspired and made possible through many people especially the staff and the many artists who show their work.

“Teamwork makes the dream work. I love the arts. You never know what’s going to happen or who is going to walk in the door,” she said.

The Sedona Arts Festival has been a significant part of arts happenings in Sedona for many years. It has evolved into becoming one of the finest arts events in the world, according to Commissioners Pat Reed and Rod Abbott who presented the Education Award to the festival.

Its mission is to increase awareness and exposure to the arts while enhancing a sense of community. The festival contributes to art programs and scholarships in Greater Sedona. It draws more than 150 artists and craftspersons from around the world. The next annual festival is scheduled for Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 9 and 10.

“The fall festival brings in hundreds of artists and thousands of visitors from around the world. It provides educational experiences for young people like the KidZone. It allows kids to explore arts in a safe, fun environment,” Reed said.

The festival has contributed approximately $245,000 for arts programs and scholarships since its inception in 1989, Abbott said.

“They are committed to artists of all ages,” he said.

No nominations were received for the Lifetime Achievement award.

The commission also presented the document “The Culture of Sedona” which was more than five years in the making, gathering information from a wide range of sources to define the culture of Sedona. The document was approved and adopted by the commission, Dec. 4, 2008, and by the Sedona City Council, Oct. 27.

 

Lu Stitt can be reached at 282-7795, ext. 122, or e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS

Online Poll

What do you donate to during the holidays?

Sedona Gas Prices

Lowest Gas Prices in Sedona
Sedona Gas Prices provided by GasBuddy.com
Sedona United States Clear (night), 25 °F
Current Conditions
Sunrise: 7:26 am   |   Sunset: 5:17 pm
27%     14.0 mph     28.615 bar
Forecast
Wed Low: 25 °F High: 62 °F
Thu Low: 31 °F High: 53 °F
Fri Low: 27 °F High: 61 °F
Sat Low: 28 °F High: 52 °F
Sun Low: 21 °F High: 52 °F
Mon Low: 19 °F High: 56 °F
Tue Low: 27 °F High: 60 °F
Wed Low: 31 °F High: 55 °F
Thu Low: 25 °F High: 54 °F
Fri Low: 26 °F High: 55 °F